Charles E. Qualls: Pharmacist, Businessman, and Civic Leader

The Charles E. Qualls papers in The Anacostia Community Museum Archives document the professional and civic efforts of Dr. Qualls in Washington, D.C.   The records date primarily from 1960 – 1983 and highlight Qualls community involvement and pharmacy business.

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The Anacostia Pharmacy, circa 1950s. Charles E. Qualls papers, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, gift of the Estate of Charles E. Qualls.

Charles E. Qualls (1912- 1984) opened the Anacostia Pharmacy in 1941. He was a graduate of Howard University‘s School of Pharmacy, was active in the National Pharmaceutical Association (NPA), and was deeply committed to his local community. In fact, his Anacostia Pharmacy, located on Nichols Avenue – later renamed Martin Luther King Avenue – became a gathering place for the community. Young people socialized at the soda fountain while older people planned for the future of Anacostia. It was from these gatherings that the vision for a community business organization was developed and eventually brought to fruition in 1949 with the establishment of Anacostia Business and Professional Association (ABPA).

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Interior of the Anacostia Pharmacy, circa 1941. Charles E. Qualls papers, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, gift of the Estate of Charles E. Qualls.

Mr. Qualls was also a founding member of the Anacostia Historical Society whose mission was to preserve and promote the history and culture of Anacostia. Qualls’ interest in preserving history led to his involvement with lobbying the federal government to establish Cedar Hill, the Frederick Douglass home, as a National Park Service historic site.

Throughout his career Dr. Qualls received numerous awards in honor of his business and civic endeavors in the District of Columbia. In 1967 he was awarded a Certificate of Appreciation by President Lyndon B. Johnson in recognition of his five years as an uncompensated member of the Selective Service System.

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Dr. Qualls helped raise funds for the Mills family who lost their home in a fire. He is pictured here receiving a check for the benefit of the Mills family from Les Sands, a radio station announcer whose station raised the funds. Circa 1948. Charles E. Qualls papers, Anacostia Community Museum Archives, gift of the Estate of Charles E. Qualls.

Charles E. Qualls died on June 21, 1984.

View the Finding Aid to the Charles E. Qualls Papers, 1899-1996, bulk 1960-1983 here!

View artifacts from Mr. Qualls collection here!

Annual Martin Luther King Jr Celebration Event with keynote speaker Dr. Khalil Gibran Muhammad

Friday January 15 saw the celebration of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr’s life and legacy, an annual program hosted by the Anacostia Community Museum, at the Baird auditorium in the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History.  The keynote address by Dr. Khalil Gibran Muhammad, director of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, New York, and an on-stage discussion on the theme of “Looking Back, Moving Forward” with moderator Richard Reyes-Gavilan, executive director of the D.C. Public Library system were well attended.

January 15, 2016 - Smithsonian Secretary David J. Skorton, Anacostia Community Museum Director Camille Akeju, Dr. Khalil Gibran Muhammad, Richard Reyes-Gavilan, and Paul Perry pose for a photograph prior to the commencement of the annual Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration event. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

January 15, 2016 – Smithsonian Secretary David J. Skorton, Anacostia Community Museum Director Camille Akeju, Dr. Khalil Gibran Muhammad, Richard Reyes-Gavilan, and Paul Perry pose for a photograph prior to the commencement of the annual Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration event. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

January 15, 2016 - Attendees gather for the 2016 Anacostia Community Museum 2016 Martin Luther King Jr. Anniversary Celebration. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

January 15, 2016 – Attendees gather for the 2016 Anacostia Community Museum 2016 Martin Luther King Jr. Anniversary Celebration. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

January 15, 2016 - Smithsonian Institution Secretary David Skorton makes remarks at the 2016 Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration hosted by the Anacostia Community Museum. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

January 15, 2016 – Smithsonian Institution Secretary David Skorton makes remarks at the 2016 Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration hosted by the Anacostia Community Museum. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

January 15, 2016 - Members of the Anacostia Museum Youth Advisory Board and Museum Academy present themselves before the audience at the Anacostia Community Museum 2016 Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration event. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

January 15, 2016 – Members of the Anacostia Museum Youth Advisory Board and Museum Academy present themselves before the audience at the Anacostia Community Museum 2016 Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration event. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

January 15, 2016 - Deputy DC Mayor for greater economic opportunity Courtney Snowden made remarks at the 2016 Martin Luther King Jr Celebration hosted by the Anacostia Community Museum. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

January 15, 2016 – Deputy DC Mayor for greater economic opportunity Courtney Snowden made remarks at the 2016 Martin Luther King Jr Celebration hosted by the Anacostia Community Museum. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

January 15, 2016 - Crazee Praize Nation performed for the Anacostia Community Museum 2016 Martin Luther King Jr Celebration event.Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

January 15, 2016 – Crazee Praize Nation performed for the Anacostia Community Museum 2016 Martin Luther King Jr Celebration event.Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

January 15, 2016 - Crazee Praize Nation performed for the Anacostia Community Museum 2016 Martin Luther King Jr Celebration event.Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

January 15, 2016 – Crazee Praize Nation performed for the Anacostia Community Museum 2016 Martin Luther King Jr Celebration event.Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

January 15, 2016 - Crazee Praize Nation performed for the Anacostia Community Museum 2016 Martin Luther King Jr Celebration event.Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

January 15, 2016 – Crazee Praize Nation performed for the Anacostia Community Museum 2016 Martin Luther King Jr Celebration event.Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

January 15, 2016 - Dr. Khalil Gibran Muhammad gave the keynote address for the Anacostia Community Museum 2016 Martin Luther King Jr Celebration event. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

January 15, 2016 – Dr. Khalil Gibran Muhammad gave the keynote address for the Anacostia Community Museum 2016 Martin Luther King Jr Celebration event. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

January 15, 2016 - Dr. Khalil Gibran Muhammad and DC Public LIbrary Executive Director Richard Reyes-Gavilan answered questions from the audience at the 2016 Martin Luther King Jr Celebration event. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

January 15, 2016 – Dr. Khalil Gibran Muhammad and DC Public LIbrary Executive Director Richard Reyes-Gavilan answered questions from the audience at the 2016 Martin Luther King Jr Celebration event. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

January 15, 2016 - Members of the audience ask questions during the 2016 Anacostia Community Museum Martin Luther King Jr Celebration event.Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

January 15, 2016 – Members of the audience ask questions during the 2016 Anacostia Community Museum Martin Luther King Jr Celebration event.Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

January 15, 2016 - Crazee Praize Nation performed for the Anacostia Community Museum 2016 Martin Luther King Jr Celebration event.Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

January 15, 2016 – Crazee Praize Nation performed for the Anacostia Community Museum 2016 Martin Luther King Jr Celebration event.Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

Urban Waterways Research Project: Asian Americans for Change in Biloxi, Mississippi

 

December 7, 2015 - Biloxi, Mississippi - MIickey Sou, a local activist in the Vietnamese community in Biloxi, MIssissippi is active in the organization Asian Americans for Change. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

Mickey Sou
Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

Urban Waterways researcher Katrina Lashley and I continued our gulf coast exploration with local activist, Mickey Sou, of Asian Americans for Change, an advocacy group that was founded in the vacuum created by Hurricane Katrina, where communities found they needed to organize to facilitate more engagement with officials in the chaos of the post-storm recovery. Mickey Sou was born in Montana, the child of Vietnamese immigrants. He was one month old when his parents relocated to Biloxi.

Many Vietnamese emigrated to the gulf coast following the end of the Vietnam war.  Biloxi has a strong Vietnamese community comprised of many of these first and second wave immigrants and their families, who established strong ties in the shrimping community.

 

Personal photographs of members of the Vietnamese community in Biloxi, Mississippi courtesy of Mickey Sou Photo credit: Courtesy of Mickey Sou

Personal photographs of members of the Vietnamese community in Biloxi, Mississippi courtesy of Mickey Sou

The warm waters of the gulf coast provided a good living for fishermen dredging the waters for oysters and shrimp. Hurricane Katrina was devastating, but many were able to go back to making their living after the storm clean-up.  The BP oil spill, five years later in 2005 severely compromised the environment and eliminated this livelihood for many.  A website, BridgeTheGulfProject.org, gathers the stories of many Gulf Coast residents and depicts the plight of Vietnamese fishermen four years after BP in the entry here.

Personal photographs of members of the Vietnamese community in Biloxi, Mississippi courtesy of Mickey Sou Photo credit: Courtesy of Mickey Sou

Mickey Sou’s father and sons, Biloxi, Mississippi. Courtesy Mickey Sou

Personal photographs of members of the Vietnamese community in Biloxi, Mississippi courtesy of Mickey Sou Photo credit: Courtesy of Mickey Sou

Mickey Sou and his mother, Mississippi. Courtesy of Mickey Sou

Personal photographs of members of the Vietnamese community in Biloxi, Mississippi courtesy of Mickey Sou Photo credit: Courtesy of Mickey Sou

Mickey Sou’s father in Vietnam. Courtesy of Mickey Sou

Personal photographs of members of the Vietnamese community in Biloxi, Mississippi courtesy of Mickey Sou Photo credit: Courtesy of Mickey Sou

Mickey Sou as a young boy growing up in Gulfport, Mississippi with his brothers. Courtesy of Mickey Sou

Personal photographs of members of the Vietnamese community in Biloxi, Mississippi courtesy of Mickey Sou Photo credit: Courtesy of Mickey Sou

Personal photographs of members of the Vietnamese community in Biloxi, Mississippi. Courtesy of Mickey Sou

December 7, 2015 - Gulfport, Mississippi - The Industrial Canal Way where the shrimp boats were parked during and before Hurricane Katrina. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

Biloxi, Mississippi – Mickey Sou shows us the Industrial Canal Way where shrimp boats and other sea vessels battened down during Hurricane Katrina.
Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

December 7, 2015 - Gulfport, Mississippi - The Industrial Canal Way where the shrimp boats were parked during and before Hurricane Katrina. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

Gulfport, Mississippi – The Industrial Canal Way where the shrimp boats were parked during and before Hurricane Katrina. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

Personal photographs of members of the Vietnamese community in Biloxi, Mississippi courtesy of Mickey Sou Photo credit: Courtesy of Mickey Sou

Personal photographs of members of the Vietnamese community in Biloxi, Mississippi courtesy of Mickey Sou

Personal photographs of members of the Vietnamese community in Biloxi, Mississippi courtesy of Mickey Sou Photo credit: Courtesy of Mickey Sou

The Chua Van Duc Buddhist Temple in Biloxi right after Hurricane Katrina in 2005.   Courtesy of Mickey Sou

December 7, 2015 - Biloxi, Mississippi - The Chua Van Duc Buddhist Temple in Biloxi Mississippi. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

December 7, 2015 – Biloxi, Mississippi – The Chua Van Duc Buddhist Temple in Biloxi Mississippi today.
Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

December 7, 2015 - Biloxi, Mississippi - Anacostia Community Museum Researcher Katrina Lashley and local Miceky Sou explore the neighborhood where the Vietnamese Catholic Church on Oak St. in Biloxi Mississippi sits next door to the Buddhist temple. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

December 7, 2015 – Biloxi, Mississippi – Anacostia Community Museum Researcher Katrina Lashley and local Miceky Sou explore the neighborhood where the Vietnamese Catholic Church on Oak St. in Biloxi Mississippi sits next door to the Buddhist temple.
Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

December 7, 2015 - Biloxi, Mississippi - The Biloxi Small Craft Harbor where local shrimpers dock their boats on the Biloxi coast. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

Biloxi, Mississippi – The Biloxi Small Craft Harbor where local shrimpers dock their boats on the Biloxi coast.
Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

December 7, 2015 - Biloxi, Mississippi - The Biloxi Small Craft Harbor where local shrimpers dock their boats on the Biloxi coast. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

Large gulf shrimp being sold wholesale. 
Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

December 7, 2015 - Biloxi, Mississippi - The Biloxi Small Craft Harbor where local shrimpers dock their boats on the Biloxi coast. Here, shrimper Duc Nguyen sells shrimp to customers directly from his boat. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

The Biloxi Small Craft Harbor where local shrimpers dock their boats on the Biloxi coast. Here, shrimper Duc Nguyen sells shrimp to customers directly from his boat.
Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

December 7, 2015 - Biloxi, Mississippi - Sea gulls, waterfowl and a pelican rest on a pier at the Biloxi Small Craft Harbor where local shrimpers dock their boats on the Biloxi coast. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

Biloxi, Mississippi – Sea gulls, waterfowl and a pelican rest on a pier at the Biloxi Small Craft Harbor where local shrimpers dock their boats on the Biloxi coast.
Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

The gulf coast today is still in recovery from natural and man-made disasters.  We hope that you will follow along as we continue to process and go deeper into our research and share with you in their own words, the experiences of these gulf coast residents and their communities.

 

 

12 Years that Changed Washington Exhibit

The Anacostia Community Museum exhibit, Twelve Years that Changed Washington. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

The Anacostia Community Museum exhibit, Twelve Years that Changed Washington.
Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

 

The Anacostia Community Museum exhibit opening for Twelve Years that Shook and Shaped Washington was a bittersweet affair, held shortly after the passing of Head Curator Portia James in early December.  Portia had worked at the Anacostia Community Museuem for over thirty years, guiding many exhibitions including this last.

 

The Anacostia Community Museum exhibit, Twelve Years that Changed Washington. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

Head Curator Portia James, pictured left, was honored at the entrance to the exhibit.
Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

 

The Anacostia Community Museum exhibit, Twelve Years that Changed Washington. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

The Anacostia Community Museum exhibit, Twelve Years that Changed Washington.
Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

The Anacostia Community Museum exhibit, Twelve Years that Changed Washington. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

Artist and printmaker Lou Stovall’s work graced the interior lobby and the Kinnard Gallery.
Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

The Anacostia Community Museum exhibit, Twelve Years that Changed Washington. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

The Anacostia Community Museum exhibit, Twelve Years that Changed Washington.
Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

The Anacostia Community Museum exhibit, Twelve Years that Changed Washington. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

Vintage radio broacasts include WAMU’s Kojo Nnamdi show, still airing today on FM 88.5
Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

The Anacostia Community Museum exhibit, Twelve Years that Changed Washington. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

Plenty of contemporary photography illuminates the struggles of times.
Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

The Anacostia Community Museum exhibit, Twelve Years that Changed Washington. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

Chuck Brown and DC Go Go music are familiar to most Washingtonians. 
Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

The Anacostia Community Museum exhibit, Twelve Years that Changed Washington. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

More illuminating were quieter events like the impact of urban planning and local historical events. 
Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

The Anacostia Community Museum exhibit, Twelve Years that Changed Washington. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

The development of the DC metro was not without displacement of communities.
Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

The Anacostia Community Museum exhibit, Twelve Years that Changed Washington. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

The Anacostia Community Museum exhibit, Twelve Years that Changed Washington.
Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

The Anacostia Community Museum exhibit, Twelve Years that Changed Washington. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

Refashioning a federal city in DC explores home rule, racial demoghraphics, urban planning, and womens and LBGT rights.  Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

The Anacostia Community Museum exhibit, Twelve Years that Changed Washington. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

The Anacostia Community Museum exhibit, Twelve Years that Changed Washington.
Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

The Anacostia Community Museum exhibit, Twelve Years that Changed Washington. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee leader Stokely Carmichael, left, and H. Rap Brown, minister of justice for the Black Panthers.  in a vintage photograph.  
Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

The Anacostia Community Museum exhibit, Twelve Years that Changed Washington. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

A signature image of community activist,  Rufus “Catfish” Mayfield in 1967 and members of Youth Pride Inc. Mayfield employed over 900 youth to clean up the neighborhoods where they lived. Associated Press Photo

The Anacostia Community Museum exhibit, Twelve Years that Changed Washington. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

The Anacostia Community Museum exhibit, Twelve Years that Changed Washington.
Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

 

 

Urban Waterways Research Project : Turkey Creek, Mississippi

Turkey Creek, Mississippi, was once an isolated waterway until the city of Gulfport's growth built around the watershed (which abuts the international airport). Today, Turkey Creek is a watershed at risk of development. Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

Turkey Creek, Mississippi, was once an isolated waterway until the city of Gulfport’s growth built around the watershed (which abuts the international airport). Today, Turkey Creek is a watershed at risk of development.
Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

In early December the Anacostia Community Museum Urban Waterways project headed to Gulfport, Mississippi to continue fieldwork on communities facing a myriad of issues on the Mississippi and Alabama Gulf Coasts.  Long before Hurricane Katrina and the BP Oil spill created environmental havoc on this major urban waterway of the Gulf Coast, communities like Turkey Creek, MS, and Africatown, AL, were being formed by newly freed slaves (Turkey Creek), and by slaves that were brought to this country and released before they were sold (Africatown).

December 13, 2015 - The community of Turkey Creek, Mississippi, abuts the waterway of the same name and is surrounded by the expansion of Gulport around the historically African American community. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

December 13, 2015 – The community of Turkey Creek, Mississippi, abuts the waterway of the same name and is surrounded by the expansion of Gulport around the historically African American community. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

Today the damaging legacy of the Jim Crow south where racial inequality informed urban planning has been compounded by natural and man-made disasters which threatens the communities researcher Katrina Lashley and I visited.

 Turkey Creek, Mississippi is the subject of a documentary by Leah Mahan, Come Hell or High Water: The Battle for Turkey Creek. The film follows local Derrick Evans’ struggle to defend the coastal Mississippi watershed where his ancestors settled as former slaves. Following his journey for ten years, Derrick and his allies confront blatant racism of city officials and short-sighted plans for development that would destroy the ecology and culture of Turkey Creek only to face our nation’s most devastating, natural and manmade disasters: Hurricane Katrina and the BP oil disaster.

 

December 13, 2015 - The community of Turkey Creek, Mississippi, abuts the waterway of the same name and is surrounded by the expansion of Gulport around the historically African American community. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

December 13, 2015 – The community of Turkey Creek, Mississippi,a sign illustrates the diversity of avian species which frequent Turkey Creek. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

By finding community stakeholders, like bird lovers, Turkey Creek was able to tell its story on the national level, by partnering with migratory birds and the Audubon Society, awareness was raised and action taken to protect the watershed.

December 13, 2015 - The community of Turkey Creek, Mississippi, abuts the waterway of the same name and is surrounded by the expansion of Gulport around the historically African American community. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

December 13, 2015 – “God Will Make A Way,” is emblazoned over the local church’s carport in Turkey Creek, Mississippi. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

Today, Turkey Creek is a small community sandwiched between the Gulfport International Airport, and strip malls.  Like many successful communities, Turkey Creek negotiated a livelihood for its residences when it established a Creosote Plant to employ its residents.  The Creosote Plant is long gone, but we toured one of the buildings associated with the plant that the community is seeking to preserve.

December 13, 2015 - Turkey Creek, Mississippi, where the airport was built near the watershed. Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

December 13, 2015 – Turkey Creek, Mississippi, where the airport was built near the watershed.
Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

 

December 13, 2015 - The community of Turkey Creek, Mississippi, abuts the waterway of the same name and is surrounded by the expansion of Gulport around the historically African American community. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

December 13, 2015 – The community of Turkey Creek, Mississippi, abuts the waterway of the same name and is surrounded by the expansion of Gulport around the historically African American community. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

 

December 8, 2015 - Mr. Eugene Johnson, a resident of Turkey Creek, MIssissippi talks about life in Turkey Creek outside a building which housed the office of the Creosote plant in Turkey Creek. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

December 8, 2015 – Mr. Eugene Johnson, a resident of Turkey Creek, MIssissippi talks about life in Turkey Creek outside a building which housed the office of the Creosote plant in Turkey Creek.
Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

Listening to the stories of what these communities struggle with, and witnessing their coalition building as they gather support among like-minded communities along the Gulf was a powerful lesson before the winter holidays.  I was poignantly reminded about how fragile our history is, the depth of human suffering, and the power and necessity of partnership in speaking truth to power.  It is through recording and disseminating stories like those of Turkey Creek and the Gulf Coast that the Anacostia Community Museum seeks to share and store history and culture for the betterment of communities in the future.

December 8, 2015 - The former office of the Creosote Plant in Turkey Creek, MIssissippi. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

December 8, 2015 – The former office of the Creosote Plant in Turkey Creek, Mississippi.
Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

 

December 8, 2015 - The former office of the Creosote Plant in Turkey Creek, MIssissippi. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

December 8, 2015 – The former office of the Creosote Plant in Turkey Creek, MIssissippi.
Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

 

December 8, 2015 - Mark TK, tours the old office of the Creosote Plant at Turkey Creek, Mississippi. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

December 8, 2015 – One of the architects working on preserving historical buildings in Turkey Creek tours the old office of the Creosote Plant at Turkey Creek, Mississippi.
Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

 

 

 

 

 

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