“Twelve Years That Shook and Shaped Washington: 1963-1975”

Installation shot of works by Lou Stovall. Deputy Director Sharon Reinckens set the placement and installation followed.

Installation shot of works by Lou Stovall. Deputy Director Sharon Reinckens set the placement and installation followed.

"After" pic - from the floor to the wall.

“After” pic – from the floor to the wall.

Another view of the installation.

Another view of the installation.

I arrived at an exciting time here at ACM; just in time for the installation of our new temporary exhibition “Twelve Years That Shook and Shaped Washington: 1963-1975”. As the Registrar for the museum, my role in the exhibition was to prepare and install the artifacts that are on display.  These artifacts are a mixture of objects and paintings held by ACM and material the museum borrowed from other museums, archives, artists and private individuals.  The information presented in the exhibition is punctuated by these artifacts – providing the visitor with historical examples to illustrate the information presented in the exhibition.

We have 13 screen-prints by Lou Stovall on view in the exhibition, illustrating many community themes and events in Washington in the late 60’s and early 70’s. I was fortunate to meet Mr. Stovall when I went to pick the artwork up at his home.  A prolific screen printer, I was invited into his studio to see where he works.  The volume of work in the studio was staggering, and absolutely beautiful.  The works that we borrowed for our exhibition may have been hidden in Mr. Stovall’s basement for years, as foretold by the condition of the plastic protecting the works.  After bringing the prints back to the museum and examining them for condition, I was greeted by bright, vibrant colors so fitting of the time period which would immediately evoke feelings of nostalgia for our visitors.

12 Years that Changed Washington Exhibit

The Anacostia Community Museum exhibit, Twelve Years that Changed Washington. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

The Anacostia Community Museum exhibit, Twelve Years that Changed Washington.
Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

 

The Anacostia Community Museum exhibit opening for Twelve Years that Shook and Shaped Washington was a bittersweet affair, held shortly after the passing of Head Curator Portia James in early December.  Portia had worked at the Anacostia Community Museuem for over thirty years, guiding many exhibitions including this last.

 

The Anacostia Community Museum exhibit, Twelve Years that Changed Washington. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

Head Curator Portia James, pictured left, was honored at the entrance to the exhibit.
Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

 

The Anacostia Community Museum exhibit, Twelve Years that Changed Washington. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

The Anacostia Community Museum exhibit, Twelve Years that Changed Washington.
Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

The Anacostia Community Museum exhibit, Twelve Years that Changed Washington. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

Artist and printmaker Lou Stovall’s work graced the interior lobby and the Kinnard Gallery.
Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

The Anacostia Community Museum exhibit, Twelve Years that Changed Washington. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

The Anacostia Community Museum exhibit, Twelve Years that Changed Washington.
Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

The Anacostia Community Museum exhibit, Twelve Years that Changed Washington. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

Vintage radio broacasts include WAMU’s Kojo Nnamdi show, still airing today on FM 88.5
Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

The Anacostia Community Museum exhibit, Twelve Years that Changed Washington. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

Plenty of contemporary photography illuminates the struggles of times.
Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

The Anacostia Community Museum exhibit, Twelve Years that Changed Washington. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

Chuck Brown and DC Go Go music are familiar to most Washingtonians. 
Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

The Anacostia Community Museum exhibit, Twelve Years that Changed Washington. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

More illuminating were quieter events like the impact of urban planning and local historical events. 
Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

The Anacostia Community Museum exhibit, Twelve Years that Changed Washington. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

The development of the DC metro was not without displacement of communities.
Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

The Anacostia Community Museum exhibit, Twelve Years that Changed Washington. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

The Anacostia Community Museum exhibit, Twelve Years that Changed Washington.
Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

The Anacostia Community Museum exhibit, Twelve Years that Changed Washington. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

Refashioning a federal city in DC explores home rule, racial demoghraphics, urban planning, and womens and LBGT rights.  Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

The Anacostia Community Museum exhibit, Twelve Years that Changed Washington. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

The Anacostia Community Museum exhibit, Twelve Years that Changed Washington.
Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

The Anacostia Community Museum exhibit, Twelve Years that Changed Washington. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee leader Stokely Carmichael, left, and H. Rap Brown, minister of justice for the Black Panthers.  in a vintage photograph.  
Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

The Anacostia Community Museum exhibit, Twelve Years that Changed Washington. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

A signature image of community activist,  Rufus “Catfish” Mayfield in 1967 and members of Youth Pride Inc. Mayfield employed over 900 youth to clean up the neighborhoods where they lived. Associated Press Photo

The Anacostia Community Museum exhibit, Twelve Years that Changed Washington. Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

The Anacostia Community Museum exhibit, Twelve Years that Changed Washington.
Photo by Susana Raab/Anacostia Community Museum/Smithsonian Institution

 

 

ACM Collections Presentation at Southwest Neighborhood Assembly

SWANA_ACM_meeting

At Arena Stage Monday, Nov. 24, 2014, 7-9 pm
The Anacostia Smithsonian Museum is asking for help to prepare a 2016 exhibit covering DC during the Kennedy/Johnson and Nixon Years (1962-1975)
During those years DID YOU march for civil rights or against the Vietnam War?
During those 12 years did you support Black power, women’s equality, pay equity, tenant’s rights, gay rights, fair housing, religious freedom, veteran benefits or any other cause to make society a better place?
Do you have stories to tell or pictures or memorabilia from that time?
Meet Dr. Josh Gorman from the Anacostia Smithsonian Community Museum who will discuss what makes objects historically valuable from a museum’s perspective, especially a community museum..
Discover the historical value of your memorabilia – from political buttons to signs, circulars, banners, handbills, or hats, tee shirts, knick-knacks, pictures or anything else that has been on the wall in the attic or at back of the closet for the past decades.
Become a part of the “Twelve Year Project” between the SW Neighborhood Assembly and the Anacostia Smithsonian Community Museum, at
Arena Stage Monday evening, November 24 at 7 pm.

© 2014 Anacostia Community Documentation Initiative | ACM Home| SI Home | Contact | Help | Privacy | Terms of Use | Contact the Web Master